Naval Artillery in The Age of Sail

Naval artillery in the Age of Sail encompasses the period of roughly 1571-1863: when large, sail-powered wooden naval warships dominated the high seas, mounting a bewildering variety of different types and sizes of cannon as their main armament. By modern standards, these cannon were extremely inefficient, difficult to load, and short ranged. These characteristics, along with the handling and seamanship of the ships that mounted them, defined the environment in which the Naval tactics in the Age of Sail developed.

Read more about Naval Artillery In The Age Of SailFiring, Artillery Types, Shot

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Naval Artillery In The Age Of Sail - Shot
... Round shot - Solid spherical cast-iron shot, the standard fare in naval battles ... This type of shot was particularly effective against rigging, boarding netting and sails since the balls and chain would whirl like bolas when fired ... The point stuck in sails, hulls or spars and set fire to the enemy ship ...

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