National Symbols of Indonesia

National symbols of Indonesia are symbols that represent Republic of Indonesia. It can represent Indonesia as a nation, Indonesian people, culture, arts, and its biodiversity. The official symbols of Indonesia are officially recognize symbols that represent Indonesia and enforced through Indonesian laws. These symbols of the state that represent Indonesian nationhood are Garuda Pancasila, Merah-Putih flag, Indonesia Raya national anthem, and Indonesian language.

Other than these official national symbols of Indonesia, there are also other symbols that widely recognize and accepted to represent Indonesia, yet does not necessarily being enforced by Indonesian laws. However some symbols that previously unnoficially recognized and had not enforced by law finally gain official recognition through law edict, such as Indonesian national flora and fauna that enforced by law in 1993.

Read more about National Symbols Of Indonesia:  Official National Symbols, Unofficial National Symbols

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National Symbols Of Indonesia - Unofficial National Symbols - National Dish
... and ethnically diverse nation such as Indonesia, the national dishes are not just staple, popular or ubiquitous dishes such as Nasi Goreng or Gado-gado ... and Soto are good examples of Indonesian national dishes, since there is no singular satay or soto recipes ... and recipes and are adopted regionally across Indonesia ...

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