National Public Safety Commission (Japan)

National Public Safety Commission (Japan)

The National Public Safety Commission (国家公安委員会, Kokka Kōan Iinkai?) is a Japanese Cabinet Office commission. It is headquartered in the 2nd Building of the Central Common Government Office at 2-1-2 Kasumigasaeki in Chiyoda, Tokyo.

The commission consists of a chairman, the, who holds the rank of Minister of State, and five members appointed by the prime minister with the consent of both houses of the Diet. The commission operates independently of the cabinet, but coordinates with it through the Minister of State.

The commission's function is to guarantee the neutrality of the police system by insulating the force from political pressure and ensuring the maintenance of democratic methods in police administration. It administers the National Police Agency, and has the authority to appoint or dismiss senior police officers.

Read more about National Public Safety Commission (Japan):  List of Current Members, List of Former Chairmen, History

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National Public Safety Commission (Japan) - History
... control, providing support for local leaders and enforcing publicmorality ... one of the foundations of the authoritarian state in Japanin the first half of the twentieth century ... The system regulated publichealth, business, factories, and construction, and it issued permits and licenses ...

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