National Learning Network

The National Learning Network (NLN) was a UK national partnership programme designed to increase the uptake of Information Learning Technology (ILT) across the learning and skills sector in England. Supported by the Learning and Skills Council and other sector bodies, the NLN provided network infrastructure and a wide-ranging programme of support, information and training, as well as the NLN Materials - a substantial range of e-learning content. The initiative began in 1999 with the aim of helping to transform post-16 education. The Government's total investment in the NLN totalled £156 million over a five-year period.

Although the network itself is no longer operational, the main output of the initiative - the NLN Materials - continue to represent one of the most substantial and wide-ranging collections of e-learning materials in the UK. Available free to the post-16 sector, they are still actively promoted and updated.

Read more about National Learning NetworkHistory, NLN Materials

Other articles related to "national learning network, learning":

National Learning Network - NLN Materials
... Four rounds of interactive learning materials were commissioned and authored under the NLN banner, covering a wide range of academic and vocational topics ... to the 800 hours of materials already available, is aimed at the Adult and Community Learning sector, covering four main topics Family Learning, English for Speakers of Other Languages, Learning to ... platforms, including within a Virtual Learning Environment (VLE) ...

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