National Council of Asian Pacific Americans

The National Council of Asian Pacific Americans (NCAPA) is a coalition of 29 national Asian-Pacific American organizations in the United States. Founded in 1996 and based in Washington D.C., NCAPA seeks to expand the influence of Asian-Pacific Americans in the legislative and legal arenas, and enhance the public's and mass media's awareness and sensitivity to Asian-Pacific American concerns.

Read more about National Council Of Asian Pacific AmericansExecutive Committee, History

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National Council Of Asian Pacific Americans - History
... The 1990s saw significant growth in the number and size of Asian-Pacific American (APA) organizations ... additional impetus after the 1996 United States campaign finance controversy, in which Asian-Pacific Americans played a significant role ... At the July 1996 Organization of Chinese Americans convention in Chicago, Illinois, the leaders of several APA organizations agreed that there was a need for an advocacy coalition which would bring ...

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