National Colours of Germany

The national colours of Germany are officially Black, Red and Gold, defined by article 22 sec. 2 of the German Basic Law constitution on the flag of Germany: Die Bundesflagge ist schwarz-rot-gold. ("The federal flag shall be black, red, and gold.").

The colours were used by nationalist and democratic revolutionaries since the Napoleonic Wars of the early 19th century, and can be recognized in Holy Roman Empire symbols since the Middle Ages. The "Gold" (Or) is nearly always represented by a shade of Yellow, as there is no distinct color "Yellow" in heraldry; they both count as "Gold".

Read more about National Colours Of Germany:  Origins, Wars of Liberation, State Colours, Use of Colours in Sports Etc.

Other articles related to "national colours of germany, colour, national, national colours":

National Colours Of Germany - Use of Colours in Sports Etc.
... German sports teams often use White as main colour, as organisations that had been founded prior to 1919 often have chosen a combination of the contemporary ... Examples are the German national football team fielded by the German Football Association (DFB) since 1908, German track and field athletes and rowers who use a red chest ring, and German race ... After 1918 and 1945, Black-Red-Gold became national colours (again) ...

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