Nashoba Brook Pencil Factory Site

The Nashoba Brook Pencil Factory Site contains the ruins of a 19th-century dam-powered pencil factory. This factory was one of several in Acton and Concord, Massachusetts at the time that brought important developments to pencil manufacturing. All that remain today of the factory are the ruins of its dam and a few mechanical components. The site is in the Nashoba Brook Conservation Area in Acton, Massachusetts, along Nashoba Brook and the old Davis Road Dam. Visitors can access the site by following a marked path from the Davis Road parking area for the Nashoba Brook Conservation Area

Read more about Nashoba Brook Pencil Factory Site19th Century Concord-based Pencil Industry, Ebenezer Wood, Nashoba Brook Mills, Trail Through Time, Timeline, See Also

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