Names For The Dutch Language

Names For The Dutch Language

Because of the turbulent history of both the Netherlands and Belgium (mostly because of the frequent change of economic and military power within the Low Countries), the names that other peoples have chosen to use to refer to the Dutch language vary more than for most other languages. The modern Dutch name for the language is Nederlands.

In general, the names for the Dutch language can be arranged in seven groups according to their origin.

Some languages use multiple forms.

Read more about Names For The Dutch LanguageHistorical Overview, Dutch, Language of Holland, Language of The Low Countries, Language of Flanders

Other articles related to "names for the dutch language, dutch":

Names For The Dutch Language - Language of Flanders
... From "Flemish" (Dutch Vlaams) or from the region this refers to "Flanders" (Dutch Vlaanderen) Basque flandriera Catalan flamenc Czech vlámština Danish ...

Famous quotes containing the words names for the, names for, language, names and/or dutch:

    Oh yes, children often commit murders. And quite clever ones, too. Some murderers, particularly the distinguished ones who are going to make great names for themselves, start amazingly early.... Like mathematicians and musicians. Poets develop later.
    John Lee Mahin (1902–1984)

    Far from being antecedent principles that animate the process, law, language, truth are but abstract names for its results.
    William James (1842–1910)

    When a language creates—as it does—a community within the present, it does so only by courtesy of a community between the present and the past.
    Christopher Ricks (b. 1933)

    If goodness were only a theory, it were a pity it should be lost to the world. There are a number of things, the idea of which is a clear gain to the mind. Let people, for instance, rail at friendship, genius, freedom, as long as they will—the very names of these despised qualities are better than anything else that could be substituted for them, and embalm even the most envenomed satire against them.
    William Hazlitt (1778–1830)

    The French courage proceeds from vanity—the German from phlegm—the Turkish from fanaticism & opium—the Spanish from pride—the English from coolness—the Dutch from obstinacy—the Russian from insensibility—but the Italian from anger.
    George Gordon Noel Byron (1788–1824)