Music Based On The Works of Oscar Wilde

This is an incomplete list of music based on the works of Oscar Wilde.

Oscar Wilde was an Irish playwright, poet, novelist, short story writer and wit, whose works have been the basis of a considerable number of musical works by noted composers. In classical genres, these include operas, ballets, incidental music, symphonic poems, orchestral suites and single pieces, cantatas, and songs and song cycles. Of more recent times, some have been the subject of musicals and film scores. Some are direct settings of Wilde's words or libretti based on them, and some are wordless settings inspired by his writings.

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Music Based On The Works Of Oscar Wilde - List of Works - Unclassified
... Composer Title Genre Date Notes Pierre Capdevielle Deux Apologues d'Oscar Wilde (Two Moral Stories of Oscar Wilde) recitation for voice and orchestra 1930-32 Francis George Scott Idyll song unpublished ...

Famous quotes containing the words oscar wilde, wilde, music, based and/or works:

    It is only by not paying one’s bills that one can hope to live in the memory of the commercial classes.
    Oscar Wilde (1854–1900)

    Popularity is the crown of laurel which the world puts on bad art. Whatever is popular is wrong.
    —Oscar Wilde (1854–1900)

    People today are still living off the table scraps of the sixties. They are still being passed around—the music and the ideas.
    Bob Dylan [Robert Allen Zimmerman] (b. 1941)

    A system of morality which is based on relative emotional values is a mere illusion, a thoroughly vulgar conception which has nothing sound in it and nothing true.
    Socrates (469–399 B.C.)

    We do not fear censorship for we have no wish to offend with improprieties or obscenities, but we do demand, as a right, the liberty to show the dark side of wrong, that we may illuminate the bright side of virtue—the same liberty that is conceded to the art of the written word, that art to which we owe the Bible and the works of Shakespeare.
    —D.W. (David Wark)