Mount Union Area School District - Budget - Real Estate Taxes

Real Estate Taxes

The school board set property tax rates in 2010-2011 at 68.9200 mills in Huntingdon County. For Mifflin County - 22.57 mills. A mill is $1 of tax for every $1,000 of a property's assessed value. Irregular property reassessments have become a serious issue in the commonwealth as it creates a significant disparity in taxation within a community and across a region. Pennsylvania school district revenues are dominated by two main sources: 1) Property tax collections, which account for the vast majority (between 75-85%) of local revenues; and 2) Act 511 tax collections (Local Tax Enabling Act), which are around 15% of revenues for school districts. The school district includes municipalities in two counties, each of which has different rates of property tax assessment, necessitating a state board equalization of the tax rates between the counties.

  • 2009-10 - 65.8900 mills for Huntingdon County and Mifflin County - 21.6900 mills.
  • 2008-09 - 59.6500 mills for Huntingdon County and Mifflin County - 20.4400.

Read more about this topic:  Mount Union Area School District, Budget

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Shamokin Area School District - Real Estate Taxes - Property Tax Relief - Act 1 Index
1 of 2006 Index regulates the rates at which each school district can raise property taxes in Pennsylvania ... Districts are not allowed to raise taxes above that index unless they allow voters to vote by referendum, or they seek an exception from the state Department of Education ... of adopting either 1) a resolution in January certifying they will not increase taxes above their index or 2) a preliminary budget in February ...

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