Moral

A moral (from Latin morālis) is a message conveyed or a lesson to be learned from a story or event. The moral may be left to the hearer, reader or viewer to determine for themselves, or may be explicitly encapsulated in a maxim.

Read more about MoralFinding Morals, Arts and Morals

Other articles related to "moral, morals":

Arts and Morals
... to take away with them while the novels of Charles Dickens are a vehicle for morals regarding the social and economic system of Victorian Britain ... Morals have typically been more obvious in children's literature, sometimes even being introduced with the phrase "The moral of the story is …" ... Aesop's Fables are the most famous of stories with strong moral conclusions ...

Famous quotes containing the word moral:

    As, therefore, we can have no dependence upon morality without religion;Mso, on the other hand, there is nothing better to be expected from religion without morality;Mnevertheless, ‘tis no prodigy to see a man whose real moral character stands very low, who yet entertains the highest notion of himself, in the light of a religious man.
    Laurence Sterne (1713–1768)

    I, who cannot stay in my chamber for a single day without acquiring some rust,... confess that I am astonished at the power of endurance, to say nothing of the moral insensibility, of my neighbors who confine themselves to shops and offices the whole day for weeks and months, aye, and years almost together. I know not what manner of stuff they are of,—sitting there now at three o’clock in the afternoon, as if it were three o’clock in the morning.
    Henry David Thoreau (1817–1862)

    In Homer and Chaucer there is more of the innocence and serenity of youth than in the more modern and moral poets. The Iliad is not Sabbath but morning reading, and men cling to this old song, because they still have moments of unbaptized and uncommitted life, which give them an appetite for more.
    Henry David Thoreau (1817–1862)