Montagu Douglas Scott

Some articles on montagu douglas scott, scott, montagu:

Lord Andrew Montagu Douglas Scott - Ancestry
... Ancestors of Lord Andrew Montagu Douglas Scott 16 ... Henry Scott, 3rd Duke of Buccleuch 8 ... Charles Montagu-Scott, 4th Duke of Buccleuch 17 ...
Lord Andrew Montagu Douglas Scott
... Lieutenant-Colonel Lord Herbert Andrew Montagu Douglas Scott, DSO, CMG (30 November 1872 – 17 June 1944), was the fifth child born to William Henry Walter Montagu Douglas Scott ... also a paternal uncle of HRH Princess Alice, Duchess of Gloucester, previously Lady Alice Montagu Douglas Scott, and thereby a maternal granduncle to HRH Prince William of ...
Louisa Montagu Douglas Scott, Duchess Of Buccleuch - Early Life, Marriage, & Family
... She married William Henry Walter Montagu Douglas Scott, Earl of Dalkeith on Tuesday 22 November 1859 in London ... Lord Dalkeith was the eldest son of the Walter Montagu Douglas Scott, 5th Duke of Buccleuch and his wife Lady Charlotte Thynne ... They had six sons and two daughters Walter Henry Montagu Douglas Scott, Earl of Dalkeith (17 January 1861 – 18 September 1886) John Charles Montagu Douglas Scott, 7th Duke ...
Lady Herbert Montagu Douglas Scott - Early Life, Marriage, & Family
... George's, Hanover Square at the age of 22, she married Lieutenant-Colonel Lord Herbert Andrew Montagu Douglas Scott, son of Sir William Henry Walter Montagu Douglas Scott ... The couple had three children Colonel Claud Andrew Montagu Douglas Scott (13 July 1906 - 24 January 1971) Marian Louisa Montagu Douglas Scott (16 June 1908 - 11 December 1996) Patricia Katherine ...
John Montagu Douglas Scott, 7th Duke Of Buccleuch - Ancestry
... Ancestors of John Montagu Douglas Scott, 7th Duke of Buccleuch 16 ... Henry Scott, 3rd Duke of Buccleuch 8 ... Charles Montagu-Scott, 4th Duke of Buccleuch 17 ...

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    —F. Scott Fitzgerald (1896–1940)

    I have never, in all my various travels, seen but two sorts of people ... I mean men and women, who always have been, and ever will be, the same. The same vices and the same follies have been the fruit of all ages, though sometimes under different names.
    Mary Wortley, Lady Montagu (1689–1762)

    How can I live among this gentle
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    Unicorns, almost,
    for they are falling into two legends
    in which their stupidity and chivalry
    are celebrated. Each, fool and herb, will be an immortal.
    —Keith Douglas (1920–1944)