Molonglo Observatory Synthesis Telescope

The Molonglo Observatory Synthesis Telescope (MOST) is a radio telescope operating at 843 MHz. It is operated by the School of Physics of the University of Sydney. The telescope is located near the Molonglo River near Canberra, Australian Capital Territory, and was constructed by modification of the East-West arm of the former Molonglo Cross Telescope, a larger version of the Mills Cross Telescope.

Read more about Molonglo Observatory Synthesis Telescope:  Design, MOST Work, Square Kilometre Array Development

Other articles related to "molonglo observatory synthesis telescope, telescope, molonglo":

Molonglo Observatory Synthesis Telescope - Square Kilometre Array Development
... MOST is being used to develop technology for the Australian site of the Square Kilometre Array telescope ... Since 2003 work has proceeded on the SKA Molonglo Prototype (SKAMP) which has included fitting new wide-band feeds, low-noise amplifiers, digital filterbanks and correlator, in order to ... a collaboration between the Australia Telescope National Facility (ATNF), the Australian Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO ...

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