Mistress of The Robes - Mistress of The Robes To Queen Victoria, 1837-1901

Mistress of The Robes To Queen Victoria, 1837-1901

  • 1837-1841: Harriet Sutherland-Leveson-Gower, Duchess of Sutherland
  • 1841-1846: Charlotte Montagu Douglas Scott, Duchess of Buccleuch and Queensberry
  • 1846-1852: Harriet Sutherland-Leveson-Gower, Duchess of Sutherland
  • 1852-1853: Anne Murray, Duchess of Atholl
  • 1853-1858: Harriet Sutherland-Leveson-Gower, Duchess of Sutherland
  • 1858-1859: Louisa Montagu, Duchess of Manchester
  • 1859-1861: Harriet Sutherland-Leveson-Gower, Duchess of Sutherland
  • 1861-1868: Elizabeth Wellesley, Duchess of Wellington
  • 1868-1870: Elizabeth Campbell, Duchess of Argyll
  • 1870-1874: Anne Sutherland-Leveson-Gower, Duchess of Sutherland
  • 1874-1880: Elizabeth Wellesley, Duchess of Wellington
  • 1880-1883: Elizabeth Russell, Duchess of Bedford
  • 1883-1885: Anne Innes-Ker, Duchess of Roxburghe
  • 1885-1886: Louisa Montagu Douglas Scott, Duchess of Buccleuch and Queensberry
  • 1886: Vacant
    • Acting Mistress of the Robes: Elizabeth Russell, Duchess of Bedford
  • 1886-1892: Louisa Montagu Douglas Scott, Duchess of Buccleuch and Queensberry
  • 1892-1895: Vacant
    • Acting Mistress of the Robes: Anne Innes-Ker, Duchess of Roxburghe, and Anne Murray, Dowager Duchess of Atholl (jointly)
  • 1895-1901: Louisa Montagu Douglas Scott, Duchess of Buccleuch and Queensberry

Read more about this topic:  Mistress Of The Robes

Famous quotes containing the words mistress, robes and/or queen:

    A new mistress is like new sheets. A little bit stiff but washings to come.
    Philip Dunne (1908–1992)

    What did you go out into the wilderness to look at? A reed shaken by the wind? What then did you go out to see? Someone dressed in soft robes? Look, those who wear soft robes are in royal palaces. What then did you go out to see? A prophet? Yes, I tell you, and more than a prophet.
    Bible: New Testament, Matthew 11:7-9.

    Jesus speaking about John the Baptist.

    Half-opening her lips to the frost’s morning sigh, how strangely the rose has smiled on a swift-fleeting day of September!
    How audacious it is to advance in stately manner before the blue-tit fluttering in the shrubs that have long lost their leaves, like a queen with the spring’s greeting on her lips;
    to bloom with steadfast hope that, parted from the cold flower-bed, she may be the last to cling, intoxicated, to a young hostess’s breast.
    Afanasi Fet (1820–1892)