Mistress of The Robes - Mistress of The Robes To Queen Elizabeth, Later Queen Elizabeth The Queen Mother, 1937-2002

Mistress of The Robes To Queen Elizabeth, Later Queen Elizabeth The Queen Mother, 1937-2002

  • 1937-1964: Helen Percy, Duchess of Northumberland (Dowager Duchess of Northumberland from 1946)
  • 1964-1990: Kathleen Hamilton, Duchess of Abercorn (Dowager Duchess of Abercorn from 1979)
  • 1990–2002: Vacant

Read more about this topic:  Mistress Of The Robes

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    No, live up to thy mighty mind,
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    John Wilmot, 2d Earl Of Rochester (1647–1680)

    A sumptuous dwelling the rich man hath.
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    —Mary Elizabeth Hewitt (b.1818)

    See the kind seed-receiving earth
    To every grain affords a birth:
    On her no showers unwelcome fall,
    Her willing womb retains ‘em all,
    And shall my Caelia be confined?
    No, live up to thy mighty mind,
    And be the mistress of Mankind!
    John Wilmot, 2d Earl Of Rochester (1647–1680)

    In the learned journal, in the influential newspaper, I discern no form; only some irresponsible shadow; oftener some monied corporation, or some dangler, who hopes, in the mask and robes of his paragraph, to pass for somebody. But through every clause and part of speech of the right book I meet the eyes of the most determined men; his force and terror inundate every word: the commas and dashes are alive; so that the writing is athletic and nimble,—can go far and live long.
    Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803–1882)

    In the early forties and fifties almost everybody “had about enough to live on,” and young ladies dressed well on a hundred dollars a year. The daughters of the richest man in Boston were dressed with scrupulous plainness, and the wife and mother owned one brocade, which did service for several years. Display was considered vulgar. Now, alas! only Queen Victoria dares to go shabby.
    M. E. W. Sherwood (1826–1903)