Mistress may refer to:

  • Mistress (lover), a woman, other than the spouse, with whom a married individual has a continuing sexual relationship
  • Schoolmistress, or female school teacher (also called a "schoolmarm"); see schoolmaster
  • A dominatrix in BDSM

Read more about Mistress:  Title or Form of Address, Ancient Religions, Culture

Other articles related to "mistress":

Sir John In Love - Recordings
... Richard Van Allan (Pistol), Wendy Eathorne (Anne Page), Felicity Palmer (Mistress Page), Elizabeth Bainbridge (Mistress Ford), Robert Tear (Fenton), Gerald English (Dr ...
Mistress Branican
... Mistress Branican (French Mistress Branican, 1891) is an adventure novel written by Jules Verne ...
Mistress - Culture
... Mistress (band), a sludge metal/grindcore band from Birmingham, England, United Kingdom Mistress (1992 film) Mistress (1987 film) starring Don Murray Mistresses (UK TV ...
Stay (Sugarland Song) - Concept
... "Stay" is a ballad of infidelity, taking the perspective of the mistress of a man who is cheating on his wife ... It begins with the mistress's insistence that the man stay with her — even if his wife should call and ask where he is — because she (the mistress) is "so tired of being lonely" ... In the third verse, the mistress then changes her mind according to Nettles, she (the woman in the song) "has her own sense of redemption and realizes she deserves more ...
Lynne Graham - Bibliography - Single Novels
... The Secret Wife (1997) The Winter Bride (1997) Mistress and Mother (1997) The Reluctant Husband (1998) One Night With His Wife (1999) The Spanish Groom (1999) The Expectant ...

Famous quotes containing the word mistress:

    So, when my mistress shall be seen
    In form and beauty of her mind,
    By virtue first, then choice, a queen,
    Sir Henry Wotton (1568–1639)

    The lover never sees personal resemblances in his mistress to her kindred or to others. His friends find in her a likeness to her mother, or her sisters, or to persons not of her blood. The lover sees no resemblance except to summer evenings and diamond mornings, to rainbows and the song of birds.
    Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803–1882)

    Mrs. de Winter: Mrs. Danvers must be furious with me.
    Maxim de Winter: Oh, hang Mrs. Danvers! Why on earth should you be frightened of her? You behave more like an upstairs maid or something, not like the mistress of the house at all.
    Mrs. de Winter: Yes, I know I do. But I feel so uncomfortable. I try my best every day, but it’s very difficult with people looking you up and down as if you were a prize cow.
    Robert E. Sherwood (1896–1955)