Minor

Minor may refer to:

  • Minor (law), an underage child
  • Academic minor, a secondary focus of an undergraduate degree
  • Minor v. Happersett, a case appealed to the US Supreme Court concerning the right to vote

Read more about Minor:  Mathematics, Surname, Sports, Vehicles, Geography, Arts and Culture, Biology

Other articles related to "minor":

175 Andromache
... Minor planets navigator 174 Phaedra 175 Andromache 176 Iduna Small Solar System bodies Minor planets Designation Groups Moons Meanings of names Pronunciation of names Asteroids Aten ...
198 Ampella
... Minor planets navigator 197 Arete 198 Ampella 199 Byblis Small Solar System bodies Minor planets Designation Groups Moons Meanings of names Pronunciation of names Asteroids Aten asteroid ...
Minor, Alabama - Demographics
... There were 456 households out of which 26.1% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 65.1% were married couples living together, 7.9% had a female householder with no husband present, and 25.4% were non-families. 23.0% of all households were made up of individuals and 13.6% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older ...
199 Byblis
... Minor planets navigator 198 Ampella 199 Byblis 200 Dynamene Small Solar System bodies Minor planets Designation Groups Moons Meanings of names Pronunciation of ...
Minor Second
... In modern Western tonal music theory a minor second is the interval between two notes on adjacent staff positions, or having adjacent note letters, whose alterations cause them to be one semitone ... The 1615 just minor second arises in the C major scale between B C and E F, and is, "the sharpest dissonance found in the scale." Play B C ...

Famous quotes containing the word minor:

    A certain minor light may still
    Leap incandescent

    Out of kitchen table or chair
    As if a celestial burning took
    Possession of the most obtuse objects now and then—
    Sylvia Plath (1932–1963)

    Even a minor event in the life of a child is an event of that child’s world and thus a world event.
    Gaston Bachelard (1884–1962)

    If, for instance, they have heard something from the postman, they attribute it to “a semi-official statement”; if they have fallen into conversation with a stranger at a bar, they can conscientiously describe him as “a source that has hitherto proved unimpeachable.” It is only when the journalist is reporting a whim of his own, and one to which he attaches minor importance, that he defines it as the opinion of “well-informed circles.”
    Evelyn Waugh (1903–1966)