Minimalist Program - Further Readings On The Minimalist Program - Works On The Main Theoretical Notions and Their Applications

Works On The Main Theoretical Notions and Their Applications

  • Boeckx, Cedric (ed). 2006. Minimalist Essays. Amsterdam: John Benjamins.
  • Bošković, Željko. 1997. The Syntax of Nonfinite Complementation. An Economy Approach. Cambridge, Mass: MIT Press.
  • Brody, Michael. 1995. Lexico-Logical Form: a Radically Minimalist Theory. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.
  • Collins, Chris. 1997. Local Economy. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.
  • Epstein, Samuel David, and Hornstein, Norbert (eds). 1999. Working Minimalism. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.
  • Epstein, Samuel David, and Seely, T. Daniel (eds). 2002. Derivation and Explanation in the Minimalist Program. Malden, MA: Blackwell.
  • Fox, Danny. 1999. Economy and Semantic Interpretation. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.
  • Martin, Roger, David Michaels and Juan Uriagereka (eds). 2000. Step by Step: Essays on Minimalist Syntax in Honor of Howard Lasnik. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.
  • Pesetsky, David. 2001. Phrasal Movement and its Kin. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.
  • Richards, Norvin. 2001. Movement in Language. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

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