Metropolitan Manila Development Authority - Sources of Funds and The Operating Budget

Sources of Funds and The Operating Budget

  • The annual expenditures including capital outlays of the MMDA is provided for in the General Appropriations Act otherwise known as the National Budget;
  • The MMDA receives an internal revenue allotment (IRA) from the President;
  • The MMDA is likewise empowered to levy fines, and impose fees and charges for various services rendered;
  • Five percent (5%) of the total annual gross revenue of the preceding year, net of the internal revenue allotment, or each local government unit, accrue and become payable monthly to the MMDA by each city or municipality. In case of failure to remit the said fixed contribution, the DBM can cause the disbursement of the same to the MMDA chargeable against the IRA allotment of the city or municipality concerned.

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