Meeting For Worship

A meeting for worship is a practice of the Religious Society of Friends (or "Quakers") in many ways comparable to a church service. These services have a wide variety of forms, creating a spectrum from typical Protestant liturgy (one extreme of programmed worship) to silent waiting for the Spirit (called unprogrammed worship).

A Meeting for Worship may start with a query; something to think about during Meeting. The query is most of the time based on one of the Quaker testimonies. Meeting will then sit in silence for 20 minutes to an hour and a half. If an attendee is provoked to share, they can stand up and speak their mind. Attendees are encouraged to speak once "the Spirit finds you", thus meaning you should only speak if the message is good for the community and beneficial to the meeting. A traditional Quaker belief is everyone has "that of God" inside, and everyone's inner light and spirit can be shown. At a few meetings, some people will stand up and sing songs or recite poetry.

Read more about Meeting For Worship:  In Britain, In U.S.

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Meeting For Worship - In U.S.
... Friends' worship is conducted in a variety of ways ... Currently there are meetings that belong to and follow the traditions of specific branches of the Religious Society of Friends, and there are independent Friends' meetings, worship groups and churches ... Pastoral meetings, as the name implies, have a pastor or minister whose job is to lead worship and preach ...

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