Means

Means may refer to:

Definitions
  • Mean (average), a term used in mathematics and statistics
  • Means (ethics), something of instrumental value in order to achieve an end
  • Means (law), an aspect of a crime needed to convince a jury of guilt in a criminal proceeding
Other uses
  • Means, Kentucky, a small town in the United States
  • Means (band), a Christian hardcore band from Regina, Saskatchewan

Other articles related to "means":

Onogurs - Etymology
... In older "Oghur" Turkic languages, On~Ono means "10" and Gar~Gurs~Gur means "tribes", so Onogurs means "People of 10 tribes" ...
Nandini
... In Sanskrit, it means daughter ... The Sanskrit word nadana Nandini means daughter, one who brings joy, the Ganges, Goddess Durga ... Nandini also means Bangara, meaning Gold ...
Voiced Labial–velar Stop - Features
... labial–velar stop Its manner of articulation is occlusive, which means it is produced by obstructing airflow in the vocal tract ... Its place of articulation is labial–velar, which means it is simultaneously articulated with the lips and with the back part of the tongue (the dorsum) against the soft palate (the velum) ... Its phonation is voiced, which means the vocal cords vibrate during the articulation ...
Zing It - Games Modes - Beat Bop
... to the Bop It version of Beat Bop thus A drum sound means "Bop It" A side whistle means "Zing It" A looping whistle means 'Loop It' ...
Basic Income Guarantee
... Furthermore, there is no means test the richest as well as the poorest citizens would receive it ... Basic Income Network emphasizes this absence of means testing in its precise definition, "The Basic Income Guarantee is an unconditional, government-insured guarantee that all citizens will have ... enforced labor or other conditional means testing ...

Famous quotes containing the word means:

    The aim of poetry, it appears, is to fill the mind with lofty thoughts—not to give it joy, but to give it a grand and somewhat gaudy sense of virtue. The essay is a weapon against the degenerate tendencies of the age. The novel, properly conceived, is a means of uplifting the spirit; its aim is to inspire, not merely to satisfy the low curiosity of man in man.
    —H.L. (Henry Lewis)

    If behind the erratic gunfire of the press the author felt that there was another kind of criticism, the opinion of people reading for the love of reading, slowly and unprofessionally, and judging with great sympathy and yet with great severity, might this not improve the quality of his work? And if by our means books were to become stronger, richer, and more varied, that would be an end worth reaching.
    Virginia Woolf (1882–1941)

    Artists have a double relationship towards nature: they are her master and her slave at the same time. They are her slave in so far as they must work with means of this world so as to be understood; her master in so far as they subject these means to their higher goals and make them subservient to them.
    Johann Wolfgang Von Goethe (1749–1832)