Matthew Arnold

Matthew Arnold (24 December 1822 – 15 April 1888) was a British poet and cultural critic who worked as an inspector of schools. He was the son of Thomas Arnold, the famed headmaster of Rugby School, and brother to both Tom Arnold, literary professor, and William Delafield Arnold, novelist and colonial administrator. Matthew Arnold has been characterized as a sage writer, a type of writer who chastises and instructs the reader on contemporary social issues.

Read more about Matthew ArnoldEarly Years, Marriage and A Career, Literary Career, Arnold's Character, Poetry, Prose

Other articles related to "matthew arnold, arnold":

Matthew Arnold - Prose - Religious Criticism
... Scholars of Arnold's works disagree on the nature of Arnold's personal religious beliefs ... Thomas Arnold, he rejected the supernatural elements in religion, even while retaining a fascination for church rituals ... Arnold seems to belong to a pragmatic middle ground that is more concerned with the poetry of religion and its virtues and values for society than with the existence of God ...
Matthew Arnold (disambiguation)
... Matthew Arnold (1822-1888) was a poet and cultural critic ... Matthew Arnold may also refer to Matthew Arnold School (Oxford), a secondary coeducational school in Oxford Matthew Arnold School (Staines), a secondary coeducational school near London Matt Arnold (bor ...

Famous quotes by matthew arnold:

    ‘Fenced early in this cloistral round
    Of reverie, of shade, of prayer,
    How should we grow in other ground?
    How can we flower in foreign air?
    MPass, banners, pass, and bugles, cease;
    And leave our desert to its peace!’
    Matthew Arnold (1822–1888)

    For rigorous teachers seized my youth,
    And purged its faith, and trimm’d its fire,
    Show’d me the high, white star of Truth,
    There bade me gaze, and there aspire.
    Even now their whispers pierce the gloom:
    What dost thou in this living tomb?
    Matthew Arnold (1822–1888)

    Sophocles long ago
    Heard it on the Aegaean, and it brought
    Into his mind the turbid ebb and flow
    Of human misery; we
    Find also in the sound a thought,
    Hearing it by this distant northern sea.
    Matthew Arnold (1822–1888)