Massachusetts Compromise

The Massachusetts Compromise was the solution reached in the controversy between Federalists and Anti-Federalists in the debate over the ratification of the United States Constitution in which the Federalists won. The compromise helped garner sufficient support for the Constitution in order to ensure its ratification and lead to the adoption of the first ten amendments, the Bill of Rights.

Anti-Federalists feared that the Constitution would overly centralize government and diminish individual rights and liberties. They sought to amend the Constitution, particularly with a Bill of Rights as a condition before ratification. Federalists insisted that the document had to be accepted or rejected as written.

When efforts to ratify the Constitution encountered serious opposition in Massachusetts, two noted anti-Federalists, John Hancock and Samuel Adams, helped negotiate a compromise. The anti-Federalists agreed to support ratification of the constitution, with recommendations for amendments should the document go into effect. The Federalists agreed to support the proposed amendments, specifically a bill of rights.

Following this compromise, Massachusetts voted to ratify the Constitution on February 6, 1788. Five states subsequently voted for ratification, four of which followed the Massachusetts model of recommending amendments along with their ratification.

United States Constitution
Text
  • : Preamble and Articles I - VII
  • Bill of Rights
  • Subsequent Amendments
Articles
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Amendments
Bill of Rights
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Other articles related to "massachusetts compromise, massachusetts, compromise":

United States Bill Of Rights - The Bill of Rights - Ratification and The Massachusetts Compromise
2, 1788 Georgia 5 ... January 9, 1788 Connecticut 6 ... February 6, 1788 Massachusetts 7 ... April 28, 1788 Maryland 8 ... May 23, 1788 South Carolina 149 ... Constitution with relative ease however, the Massachusetts convention was bitter and contentious In Massachusetts, the Constitution ran into serious, organized opposition ... and Hancock, negotiated a far-reaching compromise did the convention vote for ratification on February 6, 1788 (187–168) ...

Famous quotes containing the word compromise:

    Discourage litigation. Persuade your neighbors to compromise whenever you can. Point out to them how the nominal winner is often a real loser—in fees, expenses, and waste of time. As a peacemaker the lawyer has a superior opportunity of being a good man. There will still be business enough.
    Abraham Lincoln (1809–1865)