Mary Wollstonecraft

Mary Wollstonecraft ( /ˈwʊlstən.krɑːft/; 27 April 1759 – 10 September 1797) was an eighteenth-century British writer, philosopher, and advocate of women's rights. During her brief career, she wrote novels, treatises, a travel narrative, a history of the French Revolution, a conduct book, and a children's book. Wollstonecraft is best known for A Vindication of the Rights of Woman (1792), in which she argues that women are not naturally inferior to men, but appear to be only because they lack education. She suggests that both men and women should be treated as rational beings and imagines a social order founded on reason.

Until the late 20th century, Wollstonecraft's life, which encompassed several unconventional personal relationships, received more attention than her writing. After two ill-fated affairs, with Henry Fuseli and Gilbert Imlay (by whom she had a daughter, Fanny Imlay), Wollstonecraft married the philosopher William Godwin, one of the forefathers of the anarchist movement. Wollstonecraft died at the age of thirty-eight, ten days after giving birth to her second daughter, leaving behind several unfinished manuscripts. Her daughter Mary Wollstonecraft Godwin, later Mary Shelley, the author of Frankenstein, would become an accomplished writer herself.

After Wollstonecraft's death, her widower published a Memoir (1798) of her life, revealing her unorthodox lifestyle, which inadvertently destroyed her reputation for almost a century. However, with the emergence of the feminist movement at the turn of the twentieth century, Wollstonecraft's advocacy of women's equality and critiques of conventional femininity became increasingly important. Today Wollstonecraft is regarded as one of the founding feminist philosophers, and feminists often cite both her life and work as important influences.

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Mary Shelley - Biography - Early Life
... Mary Shelley was born Mary Wollstonecraft Godwin in Somers Town, London, in 1797 ... child of the feminist philosopher, educator, and writer Mary Wollstonecraft, and the first child of the philosopher, novelist, and journalist William Godwin ... Wollstonecraft died of puerperal fever ten days after Mary was born ...
Carl H. Pforzheimer Collection Of Shelley And His Circle
... and works of the poet Percy Bysshe Shelley and his contemporaries, including his second wife, Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley, her parents, William Godwin and Mary ... Because of its extensive Mary Wollstonecraft and Mary Shelley holdings, materials concerning women have always formed an important component of the Pforzheimer Collection ...
Mary Wollstonecraft - Major Works - Letters Written in Sweden, Norway, and Denmark (1796)
... Wollstonecraft's Letters Written in Sweden, Norway, and Denmark is a deeply personal travel narrative ... Using the rhetoric of the sublime, Wollstonecraft explores the relationship between the self and society ... While Rousseau ultimately rejects society, however, Wollstonecraft celebrates domestic scenes and industrial progress in her text ...
Nightmare Abbey - Characters
... Shelley left her and fell in love with and eventually married Mary Wollstonecraft Godwin (the future Mary Shelley) ... Harriet committed suicide and Shelley married Mary ... It is often said that she is based upon Mary Wollstonecraft Godwin ...
List Of Feminist Rhetoricians - Mary Wollstonecraft
... (1759–1797) Wollstonecraft had a short lived, but important writing career ... It lasted only nine years, but covered a wide span of genres and topics ...

Famous quotes by mary wollstonecraft:

    Women are told from their infancy, and taught by the example of their mothers, that a little knowledge of human weakness, justly termed cunning, softness of temper, outward obedience, and a scrupulous attention to a puerile kind of propriety, will obtain for them the protection of man; and should they be beautiful, every thing else is needless, for, at least, twenty years of their lives.
    Mary Wollstonecraft (1759–1797)