Mary Church Terrell House

Mary Church Terrell House was a home of civil rights leader Mary Church Terrell in Washington, D.C.. Terrell was the first black woman to serve on an American school board, in 1896. She led the fight to integrate eating places in Washington, D.C., at age 86.

Her home in the LeDroit Park section of Washington, DC was declared a National Historic Landmark in 1975. The building is a contributing property in the LeDroit Park Historic District. While the home looks as if an adjoining house was once adjacent to it, no house was ever constructed next to it. Her house was built to allow this but it never occurred.

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Famous quotes containing the words house, terrell, mary and/or church:

    If the main timbers in the house are not straight, the smaller timbers will be unsafe; and if the smaller timbers are not straight, the house will fall.
    Chinese proverb.

    I cannot help wondering sometimes what I might have become and might have done if I had lived in a country which had not circumscribed and handicapped me on account of my race, but had allowed me to reach any height I was able to attain.
    —Mary Church Terrell (1863–1954)

    Life is in the mouth; death is in the mouth.
    Hawaiian saying no. 60, ‘lelo No’Eau, collected, translated, and annotated by Mary Kawena Pukui, Bishop Museum Press, Hawaii (1983)

    ... no young colored person in the United States today can truthfully offer as an excuse for lack of ambition or aspiration that members of his race have accomplished so little, he is discouraged from attempting anything himself. For there is scarcely a field of human endeavor which colored people have been allowed to enter in which there is not at least one worthy representative.
    —Mary Church Terrell (1863–1954)