Mark Twain Boyhood Home & Museum

Mark Twain Boyhood Home & Museum

The Mark Twain Boyhood Home, now known as the Mark Twain Boyhood Home & Museum, is located on 206-208 Hill Street, Hannibal, Missouri, on the west bank of the Mississippi River in the United States. It was the home of Samuel Langhorne Clemens from 1844 to 1853. Clemens, better known as author Mark Twain, found the inspiration for many of his stories, including the white picket fence, while living here. It has been open to the public as a museum since 1912. It was designated a National Historic Landmark on December 29, 1962.

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Famous quotes containing the words mark twain, museum, home, mark, twain and/or boyhood:

    It was not a Southern watermelon that Eve took: we know it because she repented.
    Mark Twain [Samuel Langhorne Clemens] (1835–1910)

    I have no connections here; only gusty collisions,
    rootless seedlings forced into bloom, that collapse.
    ...
    I am the Visiting Poet: a real unicorn,
    a wind-up plush dodo, a wax museum of the Movement.
    People want to push the buttons and see me glow.
    Marge Piercy (b. 1936)

    Drive a nail home and clinch it so faithfully that you can wake up in the night and think of your work with satisfaction,—a work at which you would not be ashamed to invoke the Muse.
    Henry David Thoreau (1817–1862)

    The most durable thing in writing is style, and style is the most valuable investment a writer can make with his time. It pays off slowly, your agent will sneer at it, your publisher will misunderstand it, and it will take people you have never heard of to convince them by slow degrees that the writer who puts his individual mark on the way he writes will always pay off.
    Raymond Chandler (1888–1959)

    Miss Watson she took me in the closet and prayed, but nothing come of it. She told me to pray every day, and whatever I asked for I would get it. But it warn’t so. I tried it. Once I got a fish-line, but no hooks. It warn’t any good to me without hooks.
    —Mark Twain [Samuel Langhorne Clemens] (1835–1910)

    I looked at my daughters, and my boyhood picture, and appreciated the gift of parenthood, at that moment, more than any other gift I have ever been given. For what person, except one’s own children, would want so deeply and sincerely to have shared your childhood? Who else would think your insignificant and petty life so precious in the living, so rich in its expressiveness, that it would be worth partaking of what you were, to understand what you are?
    Gerald Early (20th century)