Maine State Route 228

Maine State Route 228

State Routes in Maine

← SR 227 SR 229 →

State Route 228 is part of Maine's system of numbered state highways. It runs 16.93 miles (27.25 km) from Washburn to Caribou. It begins at an intersection with State Route 164 in downtown Washburn, and ends at an intersection of State Route 161 in Caribou. The road is also known as Hines Street (in Washburn), Perham Street (in Wade and Perham), Woodland Center Road (in Woodland), and Sweden Street (in Caribou).

228 runs through the communities of Wade, Perham, and Woodland.

Read more about Maine State Route 228:  SR 228 Truck

Other articles related to "maine state route 228, state route 228, state, maine, route, maine state route":

Maine State Route 228 - SR 228 Truck
... State Route 228 Truck Location Washburn Length 0.6 mi (1.0 km) State Route 228T is part of Maine's system of numbered state highways ... It is a 0.6-mile (0.97 km) long truck route that bypasses downtown Washburn ... It begins at an intersection with Maine State Route 164 on the West side of downtown Washburn, and ends at an intersection with Maine State Route 228 just North of downtown ...

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