Machining

Machining is any of various processes in which a piece of raw material is cut into a desired final shape and size by a controlled material-removal process. The many processes that have this common theme, controlled material removal, are today collectively known as subtractive manufacturing, in distinction from processes of controlled material addition, which are known as additive manufacturing.

The precise meaning of the term "machining" has evolved over the past two centuries as technology has advanced. During the Machine Age, it referred to (what we today might call) the "traditional" machining processes, such as turning, boring, drilling, milling, broaching, sawing, shaping, planing, reaming, and tapping. In these "traditional" or "conventional" machining processes, machine tools, such as lathes, milling machines, drill presses, or others, are used with a sharp cutting tool to remove material to achieve a desired geometry. Since the advent of new technologies such as electrical discharge machining, electrochemical machining, electron beam machining, photochemical machining, and ultrasonic machining, the retronym "conventional machining" can be used to differentiate those classic technologies from the newer ones. In current usage, the term "machining" without qualification usually implies the traditional machining processes.

Machining is a part of the manufacture of many metal products, but it can also be used on materials such as wood, plastic, ceramic, and composites. A person who specializes in machining is called a machinist. A room, building, or company where machining is done is called a machine shop. Machining can be a business, a hobby, or both. Much of modern day machining is carried out by computer numerical control (CNC), in which computers are used to control the movement and operation of the mills, lathes, and other cutting machines.

Read more about Machining:  Machining Operations, Overview of Machining Technology, Cutting Conditions, Stages in Metal Cutting, Relationship of Subtractive and Additive Techniques

Other articles related to "machining":

STEP-NC - Motivation
... is given little or no information about the desired result of the machining ... STEP-NC allows more information about the machining process to be sent to the machine control and adds new information about the product being machined ... This "Smart Data for Smart Machining" enables applications such as the following Toolpath descriptions that are portable and independent of machine geometry ...
Machining Vibrations
... Machining vibrations, also called chatter, correspond to the relative movement between the workpiece and the cutting tool ... This affects typical machining processes, such as turning, milling and drilling, and atypical machining processes, such as grinding ... in grinding or regular mark left when turning a long piece on a lathe, due to machining vibrations ...
Abrasive Jet Machining
... Abrasive jet machining (AJM), also known as abrasive micro-blasting, pencil blasting and micro-abrasive blasting, is an abrasive blasting machining process that uses abrasives ...
Mechanics of Abrasive Machining
... Abrasive machining works by forcing the abrasive particles, or grains, into the surface of the workpiece so that each particle cuts away a small bit of material ... Abrasive machining is similar to conventional machining, such as milling or turning, because each of the abrasive particles acts like a miniature cutting tool ... However, unlike conventional machining the grains are much smaller than a cutting tool, and the geometry and orientation of individual grains are not well ...
Machining - Relationship of Subtractive and Additive Techniques
... proliferation of additive manufacturing technologies, conventional machining has been retronymously classified, in thought and language, as a subtractive ... can produce very intricate prototype designs impossible to replicate by machining, strength and material selection may be limited ...