Lyndon Baines Johnson Library and Museum

The Lyndon Baines Johnson Library and Museum is one of 13 Presidential Libraries administered by the National Archives and Records Administration. The Library houses 45 million pages of historical documents, including the papers of Lyndon Baines Johnson and those of his close associates and others. The Library was dedicated on May 22, 1971, with Johnson and then-President Richard Nixon in attendance. The current director is Presidential historian Mark K. Updegrove. President Johnson is buried at his ranch, near Johnson City, Texas, at the Lyndon B. Johnson National Historical Park.

The Library, adjacent to the LBJ School of Public Affairs, occupies a 14-acre (57,000 m²) campus that is federally run and independent from The University of Texas at Austin. The top floor of the Library has a 7/8ths scale replica of the Oval Office decorated as it was during Johnson's presidency. The museum provides year-round public viewing of its permanent historical and cultural exhibits and its many traveling exhibits. The Library has the highest visitation of any Presidential Library (with the exception of the first two or three years of any new Presidential Library, which in some cases sees more visitors).

After her death in July, 2007, the body of Lady Bird Johnson lay in repose in the Library and Museum, just as her husband's had after his death, 34 years earlier.

Famous quotes containing the words lyndon baines johnson, lyndon baines, museum, library, baines and/or johnson:

    I am not describing a distant utopia, but the kind of education which must be the great urgent work of our time. By the end of this decade, unless the work is well along, our opportunity will have slipped by.
    Lyndon Baines Johnson (1908–1973)

    That’s just the trouble, Sam Houston—it’s always my move. And damnit, I sometimes can’t tell whether I’m making the right move or not. Now take this Vietnam mess. How in the hell can anyone know for sure what’s right and what’s wrong, Sam?
    Lyndon Baines Johnson (1908–1973)

    The back meets the front.
    Hawaiian saying no. 2650, ‘lelo No’Eau, collected, translated, and annotated by Mary Kawena Pukui, Bishop Museum Press, Hawaii (1983)

    Madam, a circulating library in a town is as an evergreen tree of diabolical knowledge; it blossoms through the year. And depend on it ... that they who are so fond of handling the leaves, will long for the fruit at last.
    Richard Brinsley Sheridan (1751–1816)

    I am a freeman, an American, a United States Senator, and a Democrat, in that order.
    —Lyndon Baines Johnson (1908–1973)

    Let observation with extensive view;
    Survey mankind, from China to Peru;
    —Samuel Johnson (1709–1784)