Lyndon Baines Johnson Library and Museum

The Lyndon Baines Johnson Library and Museum is one of 13 Presidential Libraries administered by the National Archives and Records Administration. The Library houses 45 million pages of historical documents, including the papers of Lyndon Baines Johnson and those of his close associates and others. The Library was dedicated on May 22, 1971, with Johnson and then-President Richard Nixon in attendance. The current director is Presidential historian Mark K. Updegrove. President Johnson is buried at his ranch, near Johnson City, Texas, at the Lyndon B. Johnson National Historical Park.

The Library, adjacent to the LBJ School of Public Affairs, occupies a 14-acre (57,000 m²) campus that is federally run and independent from The University of Texas at Austin. The top floor of the Library has a 7/8ths scale replica of the Oval Office decorated as it was during Johnson's presidency. The museum provides year-round public viewing of its permanent historical and cultural exhibits and its many traveling exhibits. The Library has the highest visitation of any Presidential Library (with the exception of the first two or three years of any new Presidential Library, which in some cases sees more visitors).

After her death in July, 2007, the body of Lady Bird Johnson lay in repose in the Library and Museum, just as her husband's had after his death, 34 years earlier.

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    Our most tragic error may have been our inability to establish a rapport and a confidence with the press and television—with the communication media. I don’t think the press has understood me.
    Lyndon Baines Johnson (1908–1973)

    I’m not in the speechmaking business nowadays. I’m following the advice of an old mountain woman who said: ‘When I walks, I walk slowly. When I sits, I sits loosely. And when I feel a worry coming on, I just go to sleep.’
    Lyndon Baines Johnson (1908–1973)

    Life is in the mouth; death is in the mouth.
    Hawaiian saying no. 60, ‘lelo No’Eau, collected, translated, and annotated by Mary Kawena Pukui, Bishop Museum Press, Hawaii (1983)

    Every library should try to be complete on something, if it were only the history of pinheads.
    Oliver Wendell Holmes, Sr. (1809–1894)

    Mr. Speaker, at a time when the nation is again confronted with necessity for calling its young men into service in the interests of National Security, I cannot see the wisdom of denying our young women the opportunity to serve their country.
    —Lyndon Baines Johnson (1908–1973)

    When I was as you are now, towering in the confidence of twenty-one, little did I suspect that I should be at forty-nine, what I now am.
    —Samuel Johnson (1709–1784)