Lycoming Township

Some articles on lycoming township, township, lycoming:

Lycoming Township, Lycoming County, Pennsylvania - Demographics
... of 2000, there were 1,606 people, 614 households, and 469 families residing in the township ... The racial makeup of the township was 97.88% White, 0.37% African American, 0.06% Native American, 0.31% Asian, and 1.37% from two or more races ... In the township the population was spread out with 25.0% under the age of 18, 6.6% from 18 to 24, 27.9% from 25 to 44, 28.0% from 45 to 64, and 12.6% who were 65 years of age or older ...
History Of The Townships Of Lycoming County, Pennsylvania - Lycoming Township
... Lycoming Township was formed from part of Old Lycoming Township ... residents of the northern part of what was Lycoming Township was submitted on April 26, 1858 ... The petition asked that Lycoming Township be divided into northern and southern portions ...
Lycoming County, Pennsylvania - Municipalities - Townships
... with unincorporated villages noted) Anthony Township Armstrong Township Bastress Township Brady Township Brown Township (includes the villages of Cedar Run and Slate Run) Cascade Township (includes the village of ...
List Of Villages In Lycoming County, Pennsylvania - Villages
... Brown Township (includes the villages of Black Forest, Cedar Run and Slate Run) Cascade Township (includes the village of Kellyburg) Cogan House Township (includes ...
History Of The Townships Of Lycoming County, Pennsylvania - Old Lycoming Township
... Old Lycoming Township is a township in Lycoming County that is actually older than the county ... Northumberland County on August 22, 1785, ten years before the formation of Lycoming County ... The original boundaries of the township encompassed much of the territory that was previously governed by the Fair Play Men ...

Famous quotes containing the word township:

    A township where one primitive forest waves above while another primitive forest rots below,—such a town is fitted to raise not only corn and potatoes, but poets and philosophers for the coming ages. In such a soil grew Homer and Confucius and the rest, and out of such a wilderness comes the Reformer eating locusts and wild honey.
    Henry David Thoreau (1817–1862)