Love Is The Devil: Study For A Portrait of Francis Bacon

Love Is the Devil: Study for a Portrait of Francis Bacon is a 1998 film made for television by the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC). It was written and directed by John Maybury and stars Derek Jacobi, Daniel Craig, and Tilda Swinton.

A biography of painter Francis Bacon (Jacobi), it concentrates on his strained relationship with George Dyer (Craig), a small time thief. The film draws heavily on the authorised biography of Bacon, The Gilded Gutter Life of Francis Bacon by Daniel Farson, and is dedicated to him.

The film won three awards at the Edinburgh International Film Festival: Best New British Feature (director John Maybury) and two Best British Performance awards, one for Jacobi and, the other for future James Bond actor, Craig. The film was also screened in the Un Certain Regard section at the 1998 Cannes Film Festival.

Read more about Love Is The Devil: Study For A Portrait Of Francis Bacon:  Cast

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Love Is The Devil: Study For A Portrait Of Francis Bacon - Cast
... Derek Jacobi – Francis Bacon Daniel Craig – George Dyer Tilda Swinton – Muriel Belcher Anne Lambton – Isabel Rawsthorne Adrian Scarborough – Daniel Farson Karl Johnson – John Deakin Annabel ...

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