Louisiana African American Heritage Trail

Louisiana African American Heritage Trail (French: Sentier de l'héritage afro-américain de la Louisiane) is a cultural heritage trail with 26 sites designated in 2008 by the state of Louisiana, from New Orleans along the Mississippi River to Baton Rouge and Shreveport, with sites in small towns and plantations also included. In New Orleans several sites are within a walking area. Auto travel is required to reach sites outside the city.

A variety of African American museums devoted to art, history and culture are on the "trail", as is the Cane River Creole National Park, and the first two churches founded by and for free people of color. The trail includes two extensive plantation complexes with surviving quarters used by people who lived and worked at the plantations until 1930 in one case, and into the 1960s at the other. Two historically black universities are also on the trail.

The trail's chief state promoter has been Lieutenant Governor Mitch Landrieu, who saw its designation as a way to highlight the many contributions of African Americans to the culture of Louisiana and the United States.

Read more about Louisiana African American Heritage TrailHistoric Sites

Other articles related to "louisiana african american heritage trail, african":

sites" class="article_title_2">Louisiana African American Heritage Trail - Historic Sites
... Included are New Orleans - Congo Square New Orleans African American Museum St ... Augustine Church (New Orleans), Tremé New Orleans African American Museum St ... University Mahalia Jackson's grave, Providence Park Cemetery, Metairie Arna Bontemps African American Museum (birthplace of writer of the Harlem Renaissance), Alexandria Madam C.J ...

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