Lords of Appeal in Ordinary

Lords of Appeal in Ordinary, commonly known as Law Lords, were appointed under the Appellate Jurisdiction Act 1876 to the House of Lords of the United Kingdom in order to exercise its judicial functions, which included acting as the highest court of appeal for most domestic matters. The House of Lords, however, lost its judicial functions upon the establishment of the Supreme Court of the United Kingdom in October 2009; those in office became Justices of the Supreme Court of the United Kingdom and lost their right to speak and vote in the House of Lords until their retirement as Justices of the new court.

Read more about Lords Of Appeal In Ordinary:  Ranks and Titles, House of Lords, Size, Senior and Second Senior Law Lord

Other articles related to "lords of appeal in ordinary, lords of, lord, appeal in ordinary":

Lords Of Appeal In Ordinary - Senior and Second Senior Law Lord
... and Deputy President of the Supreme Court of the United Kingdom The two most senior Lords of Appeal in Ordinary were designated the Senior and Second Senior Lords of ... The Senior Lord of Appeal in Ordinary historically was the Law Lord who was senior by virtue of having served in the House for the longest period ... With the appointment of Lord Bingham of Cornhill in 2000, however, it became an appointed position ...

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