Long Tons

Some articles on long, long tons, tons:

SMS Rostock - Construction
... The ship was 142.2 meters (467 ft) long overall and had a beam of 13.7 m (45 ft) and a draft of 5.38 m (17.7 ft) forward ... She displaced 6,191 t (6,093 long tons 6,824 short tons) at full combat load ... Rostock carried 1,300 tonnes (1,300 long tons) of coal, and an additional 200 tonnes (200 long tons) of oil that gave her a range of approximately 5,000 nautical miles (9,300 km 5,800 ...
SMS Regensburg - Design
... The ship was 142.7 meters (468 ft) long overall and had a beam of 13.8 m (45 ft) and a draft of 5.75 m (18.9 ft) forward ... She displaced 6,382 t (6,281 long tons 7,035 short tons) at full combat load ... Regensburg carried 1,280 t (1,260 long tons) of coal, and an additional 375 t (369 long tons) of oil that gave her a range of approximately 5,500 ...
SS Milazzo - Design and Construction
... The ship was 157.7 meters (517 ft 5 in) long (between perpendiculars), was 20.1 meters (65 ft 11 in) abeam, and had a draft of 6.2 meters (20 ft 4 in ... Milazzo had a gross tonnage (GT) of 11,477 tons and displaced 20,040 long tons (20,360 t) ... As designed, Milazzo could carry up to 14,000 long tons (14,200 t) of bulk coal or other cargo ...
Creamy Kate And Trailer - Background
... Rail Motors, but was substantially larger at 55 feet (16.76 m) long ... (4 of which were seated in the guard's compartment) and 2+1⁄2 long tons (2.80 short tons 2.54 t) of luggage and out-of traffic. 38 weighed in at 27 long tons 14 hundredweights (28.1 t 31.0 short tons) 0 qtrs and was limited to 70 mph (110 km/h) ...
USS Arctic (AF-7)
... Fate scrapped, 19 August 1947 General characteristics Type Stores ship Displacement 6,100 long tons (6,200 t) (light), 12,600 long tons (12,800 t) (full load) Length 415 ft 6 in (126.64 m) Beam 53 ft (16 m) Draft ...

Famous quotes containing the words tons and/or long:

    The moralist and the revolutionary are constantly undermining one another. Marx exploded a hundred tons of dynamite beneath the moralist position, and we are still living in the echo of that tremendous crash. But already, somewhere or other, the sappers are at work and fresh dynamite is being tamped in place to blow Marx at the moon. Then Marx, or somebody like him, will come back with yet more dynamite, and so the process continues, to an end we cannot foresee.
    George Orwell (1903–1950)

    There’s a long story, my friend. I never did like the idea of sitting on newspapers. I did it once and all the headlines came off on my white pants. On the level, it actually happened. Nobody bought a paper that day. They just followed me around over town and read the news off the seat of my pants.
    Robert Riskin (1897–1955)