Long Parliament

The Long Parliament of England was established on 3 November 1640 to pass financial bills, following the Bishops' Wars. It received its name from the fact that through an Act of Parliament, it could be dissolved only with the agreement of the members and those members did not agree to its dissolution until after the English Civil War and at the end of Interregnum in 1660. It sat from 1640 until 1648, when it was purged, by the New Model Army. In the chaos following the death of Oliver Cromwell in 1658, General George Monck allowed the members barred in 1648 to retake their seats so that they could pass the necessary legislation to allow the Restoration and dissolve the Long Parliament. This cleared the way for a new Parliament, known as the Convention Parliament, to be elected. However many of these original members of Long Parliament, such as were barred from the final acts of the Long Parliament and executed by King Charles II upon his restoration, claimed that the Long Parliament was never legally dissolved.

The Long Parliament comprised "a set of the greatest geniuses for government, that the world ever saw embarked together in one common cause" and whose actions produced an effect, which, at the time, made their country the wonder and admiration of the world, and is still felt and exhibited far beyond the borders of that country, in the progress of reform, and the advancement of popular liberty. The Long Parliament and the republican views of many of the members of the Long Parliament are believed by some historians, such as Charles Upham, as a precursor to the American revolution based on the same republican principles.

Read more about Long Parliament:  September 24, 1640–December 5, 1648 Establishment, Trial of Strafford, Implicating The King, Reconci, December 6, 1648–April 20, 1653 Rump Parliament, April 21, 1653 - September 30, 1659 Recall, October 1, 1659 - January 1, 1660 Disruption of Long Parliament, 1660 Restoration, After Effects, Royalist and Republican Theories, Notable Members of The Long Parliament, Time Line

Other articles related to "parliament, long, long parliament, parliaments":

Benjamin Rudyerd - Political Career
... When the post was abolished in 1647, Parliament voted him £6,000 in compensation for its loss.) He had a long career in parliament and most of the constituencies for ... In 1621, he was elected Member of Parliament for Portsmouth ... until 1629 when King Charles decided to rule without parliament for eleven years ...
Edmund Prideaux - Long Parliament
... Prideaux was returned to the Long Parliament for Lyme Regis (which seat he held till his death), and forthwith took sides against King Charles I ... His subscription for the defence of parliament, in 1642, was £100 ... two houses, Prideaux was one of the commissioners in charge of the Great Seal of Parliament, an office worth £1,500 a year, and, as a mark of respect, was, by order of the ...
Five Members - Time Line
... imprisoned 26 February 1641 Act against Dissolving the Long Parliament without its own Consent 11 May 1641 Thomas Wentworth, 1st Earl of Strafford executed May 12, 1641 ... agreed by Lords and Commons 5 March 1642 Parliament decreed that Parliamentary Ordinances were valid without royal assent following the King's refusal to assent to the Militia Ordinance 15 March 1642 ...
Long Parliament - Time Line
... Archbishop William Laud imprisoned 26 February 1641 Act against Dissolving the Long Parliament without its own Consent 11 May 1641 Thomas Wentworth, 1st Earl of ... Court for the North 2 March 1642 Militia Ordinance agreed by Lords and Commons 5 March 1642 Parliament decreed that Parliamentary Ordinances were valid without ...
Brecon (UK Parliament Constituency) - Members of Parliament - Members of Parliament 1640–1660
... This sub-section includes the Long Parliament and the Rump Parliament, together with the Parliaments of the Commonwealth and the Protectorate (before the ... Member Note 3 ... November 1640 Herbert Price Long Parliament... 20 ... April 1653 Ludovic Lewis Rump Parliament.. ...

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