Log Lady

Margaret Lanterman, better known as the Log Lady, is a character in the television series Twin Peaks (1990–1991), created by Mark Frost and David Lynch. The character makes semi-regular appearances in both seasons, and is played by Catherine E. Coulson, who also very briefly reprised the role for a single scene in the prequel film Twin Peaks: Fire Walk with Me.

Read more about Log Lady:  Character Overview

Other articles related to "log lady, log":

Log Lady - History - History Within The Series and Feature Film
... is revealed that some time before the events of the series, the Log Lady's husband was a lumberjack who died in a fire on their wedding night decades before ... (The Log Lady later says that her husband "met the devil") ... that the wood "holds many spirits", so it is possible that her husband's spirit resides in her log.) On February 18, 1989, five days before Laura Palmer is murdered ...
Lil The Dancer - Locals - Margaret Lanterman (Log Lady)
... Margaret Lanterman, better known as the Log Lady, makes semi-regular appearances in both seasons, and is played by Catherine E ... The Log Lady is a fixture in the town of Twin Peaks by the time of Laura Palmer's murder, and most residents in the town regard her as crazy ... This is mainly due to her habit of always carrying a small log in her arms, with which she seems to share a psychic connection, often dispensing advice and visions of clairvoyance which she ...

Famous quotes containing the words lady and/or log:

    Don’t be so ready to defy everybody. Act as if you expected to have your own way, not as if you expected to be ordered about. The way to get on as a lady is the same as the way to get on as a servant: you’ve got to know your place.
    George Bernard Shaw (1856–1950)

    The most interesting dwellings in this country, as the painter knows, are the most unpretending, humble log huts and cottages of the poor commonly; it is the life of the inhabitants whose shells they are, and not any peculiarity in their surfaces merely, which makes them picturesque.
    Henry David Thoreau (1817–1862)