Literature and Science

Literature and Science is a 1963 book by Aldous Huxley.

In these reflections on the relations between art and science, Aldous Huxley attempts to discern the similarities and differences implicit in scientific and literary language, and he offers his opinions on the influence that each discipline exerts upon the other.

Works by Aldous Huxley
Novels
  • Crome Yellow (1921)
  • Antic Hay (1923)
  • Those Barren Leaves (1925)
  • Point Counter Point (1928)
  • Brave New World (1932)
  • Eyeless in Gaza (1936)
  • After Many a Summer (1939)
  • Time Must Have a Stop (1944)
  • Ape and Essence (1948)
  • The Genius and the Goddess (1955)
  • Island (1962)
Short stories
  • "Happily Ever After"
  • "Eupompus Gave Splendour to Art by Numbers"
  • "Cynthia"
  • "The Bookshop"
  • "The Death of Lully"
  • "Sir Hercules"
  • "The Gioconda Smile"
  • "The Tillotson Banquet"
  • "Green Tunnels"
  • "Nuns at Luncheon"
  • "Little Mexican"
  • "Hubert and Minnie"
  • "Fard"
  • "The Portrait"
  • "Young Archimedes"
  • "Half Holiday"
  • "The Monocle"
  • "Fairy Godmother"
  • "Chawdron"
  • "The Rest Cure"
  • "The Claxtons"
  • "After the Fireworks"
  • "Jacob's Hands: A Fable" (published 1997) co-written with Christopher Isherwood
Short story collections
  • Limbo (1920)
  • Mortal Coils (1922)
  • Little Mexican (US title: Young Archimedes) (1924)
  • Two or Three Graces (1926)
  • Brief Candles (1930)
  • Collected Short Stories (1957)
Poetry
  • The Burning Wheel (1916)
  • Jonah (1917)
  • The Defeat of Youth (1918)
  • Leda (1920)
  • Arabia Infelix (1929)
  • The Cicadias and Other Poems (1931)
  • Collected Poetry (1971)
Travel writing
  • Along the Road (1925)
  • Jesting Pilate (1926)
  • Beyond the Mexique Bay (1934)
Essay collections
  • On the Margin (1923)
  • Essays New and Old (1926)
  • Proper Studies (1927)
  • Do What You Will (1929)
  • Vulgarity in Literature (1930)
  • Music at Night (1931)
  • Texts and Pretexts (1932)
  • The Olive Tree (1936)
  • Ends and Means (1937)
  • Words and their Meanings (1940)
  • Science, Liberty and Peace (1946)
  • Themes and Variations (1950)
  • The Doors of Perception (1954)
  • Adonis and the Alphabet (US title: Tomorrow and Tomorrow and Tomorrow) (1956)
  • Heaven and Hell (1956)
  • Collected Essays (1958)
  • Brave New World Revisited (1958)
  • Literature and Science (1963)
  • The Human Situation: 1959 Lectures at Santa Barbara (1977)
  • Moksha: Writings on Psychedelics and the Visionary Experience (1999)
Screenplays
  • Pride and Prejudice (1940)
  • Madame Curie (uncredited, 1943)
  • Jane Eyre (1944)
  • A Woman's Vengeance (1947)
  • Prelude to Fame (1950)
  • Alice in Wonderland (uncredited, 1951)
Non-fiction
  • The Perennial Philosophy (1945) Grey Eminence (1941)
  • The Devils of Loudun (1952)
Plays
  • The Discovery (based on Frances Sheridan) (1924)
  • The World of Light (1931)
  • The Gioconda Smile (play version, also known as Mortal Coils) (1948)
  • The Genius and the Goddess (play version, with Betty Wendel) (1957)
  • The Ambassador of Captripedia (1965)
  • Now More Than Ever (1997)
Children's books
  • The Crows of Pearblossom (1944, published 1967)
  • The Travails and Tribulations of Geoffrey Peacock (1967)
Other books
  • The Art of Seeing (1942)
  • Selected Letters (2007)


Other articles related to "literature and science":

History Of Florence - Renaissance - Role in Art, Literature and Science
... Added to this, the crises of the Catholic church (especially the controversy over the French Avignon Papacy and the Great Schism) along with the catastrophic effects of the Black Death were to lead to a re-evaluation of medieval values, resultant in the development of a humanist culture, stimulated by the works of Petrarch and Boccaccio ... This prompted a revisitation and study of the classical antiquity, leading to the Renaissance ...

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