List of University of Oxford People in British Public Life

List Of University Of Oxford People In British Public Life

This is a list of University of Oxford people in British public life. Many were students at one (or more) of the colleges of the University, and others held fellowships at a college.

This list forms part of a series of lists of people associated with the University of Oxford – for other lists, please see the main article List of University of Oxford people.


This is an incomplete list, which may never be able to satisfy particular standards for completeness. You can help by expanding it with reliably sourced entries.

Read more about List Of University Of Oxford People In British Public Life:  Monarchs, Royal Persons, Prime Ministers, Her Majesty's Government (United Kingdom) (since 12 May 2010), Shadow Cabinet of The United Kingdom, House of Lords and House of Commons, British Members of The European Parliament, Sub-national Politicians, Civil Servants, Diplomats, Members of The Royal Household, Military, Security, and Police Personnel, Other Notable British People

Other articles related to "oxford, university":

List Of University Of Oxford People In British Public Life - Other Notable British People
... Name College Years at Oxford Notes Ref Peter Benenson Balliol 1939–1940 Left Oxford because of WWII ... Hall 2004–2007 Son of Tony Blair, Bachelor of Arts Modern History, Co-Chair Oxford University Labour Club Trinity Term 2006, schoolmaster Beau Brummell Oriel 1794–? Arbiter of ... Vivien Duffield Lady Margaret Hall 1963–? Philanthropist Arnold Goodman, Baron Goodman University 1976–1986 (Master of University College) Chairman of the Arts Council of Great Britain 1965–72 Aletha Hayter Lady ...

Famous quotes containing the words public life, list of, public, life, british, list, university, oxford and/or people:

    Hilary Clinton’s great sin was that she left the nicely wallpapered domestic sphere with a slam of the door, took up public life on her own, leaving big feminist footprints all over the place, and without so much as an apology.
    Patricia J. Williams (b. 1942)

    I made a list of things I have
    to remember and a list
    of things I want to forget,
    but I see they are the same list.
    Linda Pastan (b. 1932)

    Nothing is so foolish, they say, as for a man to stand for office and woo the crowd to win its vote, buy its support with presents, court the applause of all those fools and feel self-satisfied when they cry their approval, and then in his hour of triumph to be carried round like an effigy for the public to stare at, and end up cast in bronze to stand in the market place.
    Desiderius Erasmus (c. 1466–1536)

    Every creature is better alive than dead, men and moose and pine trees, and he who understands it aright will rather preserve its life than destroy it.
    Henry David Thoreau (1817–1862)

    We “need” cancer because, by the very fact of its incurability, it makes all other diseases, however virulent, not cancer.
    Gilbert Adair, British author, critic. “Under the Sign of Cancer,” Myths and Memories (1986)

    Do your children view themselves as successes or failures? Are they being encouraged to be inquisitive or passive? Are they afraid to challenge authority and to question assumptions? Do they feel comfortable adapting to change? Are they easily discouraged if they cannot arrive at a solution to a problem? The answers to those questions will give you a better appraisal of their education than any list of courses, grades, or test scores.
    Lawrence Kutner (20th century)

    Priests are not men of the world; it is not intended that they should be; and a University training is the one best adapted to prevent their becoming so.
    Samuel Butler (1835–1902)

    Christianity as an organized religion has not always had a harmonious relationship with the family. Unlike Judaism, it kept almost no rituals that took place in private homes. The esteem that monasticism and priestly celibacy enjoyed implied a denigration of marriage and parenthood.
    Beatrice Gottlieb, U.S. historian. The Family in the Western World from the Black Death to the Industrial Age, ch. 12, Oxford University Press (1993)

    People are always blaming their circumstances for what they are. I don’t believe in circumstances. The people who get on in this world are the people who get up and look for the circumstances they want, and, if they can’t find them, make them.
    George Bernard Shaw (1856–1950)