List of United States Comedy Films

This is a list of United States comedy films.

It is separated into two categories: short films and feature films. Any film over 40 minutes long is considered to be of feature-length (although most feature films produced since 1950 are considerably longer, those made in earlier decades frequently ranged from little more than an hour to as little as four reels, which amounted to about 44 minutes).

This is an incomplete list, which may never be able to satisfy particular standards for completeness. You can help by expanding it with reliably sourced entries.

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