List of Shape-note Tunebooks

List Of Shape-note Tunebooks

Shape notes are a system of music notation designed to facilitate choral singing. Shape notes of various kinds have been used for over two centuries in a variety of sacred choral music traditions practiced primarily in the Southern region of the United States.

"Shape-note singers used tune books rather than hymnals. Hymnals were pocket-size books with texts only. Tune books were large oblong-shaped books with hard covers (nine inches by six inches was a typical size), often running to over four hundred pages. They included both music and text and were introduced by an extended essay on the rudiments of singing. Each song was known by the name given to its tune rather than by a title drawn from the text."

The following is a partial list of the shape note tunebooks published over the last two centuries. The list is divided according the two main systems of shape notes--four-shape vs. seven-shape--and within these two categories is sorted chronologically.

For full information on shape-note tunebooks, including a list of public-domain tunebooks available online, see Shape note.

Read more about List Of Shape-note Tunebooks:  Four-shape Shape-note Tunebooks, Seven-shape Shape-note Tunebooks (partial)

Famous quotes containing the words list of and/or list:

    Shea—they call him Scholar Jack—
    Went down the list of the dead.
    Officers, seamen, gunners, marines,
    The crews of the gig and yawl,
    The bearded man and the lad in his teens,
    Carpenters, coal-passers—all.
    Joseph I. C. Clarke (1846–1925)

    Do your children view themselves as successes or failures? Are they being encouraged to be inquisitive or passive? Are they afraid to challenge authority and to question assumptions? Do they feel comfortable adapting to change? Are they easily discouraged if they cannot arrive at a solution to a problem? The answers to those questions will give you a better appraisal of their education than any list of courses, grades, or test scores.
    Lawrence Kutner (20th century)