List of Recurring The Simpsons Characters - Snake Jailbird

Chester "Snake" Turley, also known as Snake Jailbird, is voiced by Hank Azaria. A prominent antagonist in the series, he is Springfield's resident recidivist felon, consistently getting arrested for violent crimes but rarely appearing to stay in jail. He speaks with a "Valley Boy" accent. He is partial to fast cars and fast women, and has a knack for reckless abandon. He owned a car called Li'l Bandit, which Homer won at a police auction (as seen in "Realty Bites").

Snake first appeared in the season two episode "The War of the Simpsons" as one of the partygoers during Bart and Lisa's wild house party. Whenever Snake appears in prison, his prison number is always 7F20, the production code of "The War of the Simpsons". Hank Azaria's voice for Snake was based on a roommate he had while in college.) His name was first mentioned by Sideshow Bob in "Black Widower" when Sideshow Bob was saying goodbye to his prison friends after being granted parole. The character was originally named Jailbird. The animators assigned him to the role of Snake in season three's "Black Widower" and the character has gone by that name ever since.

In the episode "The Seemingly Never-Ending Story", Lisa tells a story in which Snake refers to himself as Professor Jailbird, an Indiana Jones-like archeologist who turned to robbing convenience stores as revenge for the theft of valuable coins he had excavated. Snake attended Middlebury College, as he robs Moe's Tavern to pay off his student loans and is shown wearing a Middlebury shirt in "22 Short Films About Springfield". He also played lacrosse at Ball State University, according to "Treehouse of Horror IX", although it should be noted that the "Treehouse" episodes are considered non-canon. He has a casually hostile relationship with Apu Nahasapeemapetilon, whose convenience store he robs so frequently that Apu considers the continual robberies perfectly normal. Snake is often used as a cutaway foil for Apu; often, when Apu mentions his absence from the Kwik-E-Mart, Snake is shown robbing it, with various snide remarks. In the episode "Marge in Chains", he literally "shoplifts", stealing the entire Kwik-E-Mart shop via a flat-bed truck, declaring "I'm taking this baby to Mexico!". In "Yokel Chords", he and Apu are seen in a psychiatrist's office, bickering about Snake's robberies and shootings in the manner of an unhappily married couple.

Snake has a son named Jeremy, who looks just like him (who was introduced in "Pygmoelian") and likes to steal bicycles, a trait that Snake encourages. Unlike his father, Jeremy is rather timid as seen in The Seemingly Never-Ending Story. Snake has another child on the way; however, it has been implied he and the mother, Gloria, are no longer in a romantic relationship in the episode "Homer and Lisa Exchange Crosswords". In the episode "Wedding For Disaster" Snake and Gloria are seen getting married at city hall. In the episode, "Sex, Pies and Idiot Scrapes", he is seen with the pregnant Gloria driving a car.

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... Chester "Snake" Turley, also known as Snake Jailbird, is voiced by Hank Azaria ... Snake first appeared in the season two episode "The War of the Simpsons" as one of the partygoers during Bart and Lisa's wild house party ... Whenever Snake appears in prison, his prison number is always 7F20, the production code of "The War of the Simpsons" ...
A Hunka Hunka Burns In Love - Production - Writing
... the staff decided to leave it out since it would make Homer "unlikable." In the episode, Snake Jailbird's mailbox reads "Snake (Jailbird)" which is a reference to a debate ... changed it into Gloria falling in love with Snake again ...

Famous quotes containing the word snake:

    If this creature is a murderer, then so are we all. This snake has killed one British soldier; we have killed many. This is not murder, gentlemen. This is war.
    —Administration in the State of Sout, U.S. public relief program (1935-1943)