List of Professorships At The University of Oxford

This is a list of professorships at the University of Oxford. During the early history of the university, the title of professor meant a doctor who taught. From the 16th century, it was used for those holding a chair. The university has sometimes created professorships for an individual, the chair coming to an end when that individual dies or retires. These are not listed here. The Regius Professorships are royal chairs created by a reigning monarch. The first five (in civil law, divinity, medicine, Hebrew and Greek) are sometimes called the Henrician chairs.

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