List of Names and Terms of Address Used For Charles De Gaulle

List Of Names And Terms Of Address Used For Charles De Gaulle

In France, Charles de Gaulle is called or referred to with different names, depending on who is talking, and possibly what are feelings of the person talking about De Gaulle are. This article gives a list of several names and terms of address used in France with respect to him.

Charles de Gaulle, when he was fighting with his Free French forces, and when he was president, was a somewhat controversial person, and, to some extent, the way he was referred to indicated the political leanings of the speaker. While the political controversies have now largely ceased, some distinctions are still relevant today (for instance, the use of le Général almost always indicates that the speaker is a nostalgic Gaullist supporter).

Read more about List Of Names And Terms Of Address Used For Charles De GaulleNames in Current Use, Historical Names

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List Of Names And Terms Of Address Used For Charles De Gaulle - Historical Names
... le colonel Motors This is how de Gaulle was called by jokers in the French military in the 1930s ... De Gaulle's proposals that the French army should emphasize the use of tanks and armored vehicles were scorned by the high command ... Consequently de Gaulle was refused promotions to the rank of general, and remained a colonel until the fall of France in June 1940, when his theories sadly proved right ...

Famous quotes containing the words charles de gaulle, list of, gaulle, list, names, terms and/or address:

    One does not arrest Voltaire.
    Charles De Gaulle (1890–1970)

    The advice of their elders to young men is very apt to be as unreal as a list of the hundred best books.
    Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr. (1841–1935)

    For all of us Frenchmen, the guiding rule of our epoch is to be faithful to France.
    —Charles De Gaulle (1890–1970)

    I am opposed to writing about the private lives of living authors and psychoanalyzing them while they are alive. Criticism is getting all mixed up with a combination of the Junior F.B.I.- men, discards from Freud and Jung and a sort of Columnist peep- hole and missing laundry list school.... Every young English professor sees gold in them dirty sheets now. Imagine what they can do with the soiled sheets of four legal beds by the same writer and you can see why their tongues are slavering.
    Ernest Hemingway (1899–1961)

    The world is never the same as it was.... And that’s as it should be. Every generation has the obligation to make the preceding generation irrelevant. It happens in little ways: no longer knowing the names of bands or even recognizing their sounds of music; no longer implicitly understanding life’s rules: wearing plaid Bermuda shorts to the grocery and not giving it another thought.
    Jim Shahin (20th century)

    In colonial America, the father was the primary parent. . . . Over the past two hundred years, each generation of fathers has had less authority than the last. . . . Masculinity ceased to be defined in terms of domestic involvement, skills at fathering and husbanding, but began to be defined in terms of making money. Men had to leave home to work. They stopped doing all the things they used to do.
    Frank Pittman (20th century)

    I believe the alphabet is no longer considered an essential piece of equipment for traveling through life. In my day it was the keystone to knowledge. You learned the alphabet as you learned to count to ten, as you learned “Now I lay me” and the Lord’s Prayer and your father’s and mother’s name and address and telephone number, all in case you were lost.
    Eudora Welty (b. 1909)