List of Italian Actors

List Of Italian Actors

This is a list of male actors from Italy, which generally means those who reside in Italy or those who have appeared largely in Italy film productions. The origin of this list is in collation of actor-stubs that contain reference to the actor or actress being an "Italian actor" or other indicative phrase. It also includes all actors in Category:Italian actors.

Persons are listed alphabetically according to their surname.

For a complete list of female Italian actresses, see: List of Italian actresses.

This is an incomplete list, which may never be able to satisfy particular standards for completeness. You can help by expanding it with reliably sourced entries.
Contents
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
See also References Notes External links

Read more about List Of Italian Actors:  A, B, C, D, E, F, G, H, I, L, M, N, O, P, R, S, T, U, V, W, Z

Famous quotes containing the words list of, actors, list and/or italian:

    My list of things I never pictured myself saying when I pictured myself as a parent has grown over the years.
    Polly Berrien Berends (20th century)

    To save the theatre, the theatre must be destroyed, the actors and actresses must all die of the plague. They poison the air, they make art impossible. It is not drama that they play, but pieces for the theatre. We should return to the Greeks, play in the open air: the drama dies of stalls and boxes and evening dress, and people who come to digest their dinner.
    Eleonora Duse (1858–1924)

    I am opposed to writing about the private lives of living authors and psychoanalyzing them while they are alive. Criticism is getting all mixed up with a combination of the Junior F.B.I.- men, discards from Freud and Jung and a sort of Columnist peep- hole and missing laundry list school.... Every young English professor sees gold in them dirty sheets now. Imagine what they can do with the soiled sheets of four legal beds by the same writer and you can see why their tongues are slavering.
    Ernest Hemingway (1899–1961)

    Semantically, taste is rich and confusing, its etymology as odd and interesting as that of “style.” But while style—deriving from the stylus or pointed rod which Roman scribes used to make marks on wax tablets—suggests activity, taste is more passive.... Etymologically, the word we use derives from the Old French, meaning touch or feel, a sense that is preserved in the current Italian word for a keyboard, tastiera.
    Stephen Bayley, British historian, art critic. “Taste: The Story of an Idea,” Taste: The Secret Meaning of Things, Random House (1991)