List of Historic Houses in Massachusetts - Eastern Massachusetts - Middlesex County

Middlesex County

  • Arlington
    • Jason Russell House (Arlington) – Bloodiest spot in the Battle of Lexington and Concord; built 1740
  • Burlington
    • Wyman House (Burlington) – oldest house in Burlington, built c. 1666
  • Cambridge
    • Cooper-Frost-Austin House (Cambridge) – oldest house in Cambridge; built c. 1681
    • Elmwood (Cambridge) – birthplace and home of poet James Russell Lowell; built 1767
    • Asa Gray House (Cambridge) – designed by Ithiel Town, home of botanist Asa Gray
    • Hooper-Lee-Nichols House (Cambridge) – 2nd oldest house in Cambridge; 1685
  • Chelmsford
    • Barrett-Byam Homestead – (Chelmsford) – prior to 1663
    • "Old Chelmsford" Garrison House – (Chelmsford) – prior to 1691
  • Concord
    • The Old Manse (Concord) – built by Ralph Waldo Emerson's grandfather; Emerson and Nathaniel Hawthorn wrote some of their work in the house; 1770
    • Orchard House (Concord) – home of Louisa May Alcott; the novel Little Women was written here
    • The Wayside (Concord) – home of Louisa May Alcott and later Nathaniel Hawthorne
    • Bush, Ralph Waldo Emerson House (Concord) – home of Ralph Waldo Emerson
    • Reuben Brown House – Colonial style built in 1725
  • Lexington
    • Hancock-Clarke House (Lexington) – home of the Reverend John Hancock (grandfather of John Hancock, signer of the Declaration of Independence) and the Reverend Jonas Clarke; built between 1698 and 1738 in Lexington, Massachusetts
  • Lincoln
    • Codman House (Lincoln) – Federal style; built 1735
    • Gropius House (Lincoln) – designed by Walter Gropius; 1938
    • Hoar Tavern (Lincoln) – Oldest home in Lincoln; built 1680
  • Medford
    • Grandfather's House (Medford) – original destination from "Over the River and Through the Woods"
    • Isaac Royall House (Medford) – a very fine mansion from the early 18th century with New England's only surviving slave quarters
    • Peter Tufts House (Medford) – perhaps the oldest all-brick house in the United States
  • Lowell
    • Whistler House Museum of Art (Lowell) – birthplace of painter James McNeill Whistler
  • Natick
    • Henry Wilson Shoe Shop – Henry Wilson, eighteenth Vice President of the United States, made shoes in this ten footer.
  • Newton
    • Dupee Estate-Mary Baker Eddy Home
    • Reginald A. Fessenden House (Newton) – home of technologist Reginald Aubrey Fessenden
  • Somerville
    • Samuel Gaut House (Somerville) – Italianate style; built 1855
  • Stoneham, Massachusetts
    • Shoe Shop-Doucette Ten Footer, 1850 ten footer
  • Townsend
    • Reed Homestead (Townsend) – murals by Rufus Porter, founder of Scientific American
  • Waltham
    • Gore Place (Waltham) – brick country estate; built 1806
    • Lyman Estate (Waltham) – country estate; built 1793
    • Robert Treat Paine Estate (Waltham) – country estate, collaboration of Henry Hobson Richardson and Frederick Law Olmsted; built 1866 and 1884
  • Watertown
    • Abraham Browne House (Watertown) – circa 1694–1701
    • Edmund Fowle House (Watertown) – site of revolutionary government and first US treaty; early 1740s
  • Woburn
    • 1790 House (Woburn) – large Federal house with interesting history; 1790
    • Baldwin House (Woburn) – home of engineer Col. Loammi Baldwin; 1661
    • Benjamin Thompson House-Count Rumford Birthplace (Woburn) – birthplace of Benjamin Thompson, also known as Count Rumford

Read more about this topic:  List Of Historic Houses In Massachusetts, Eastern Massachusetts

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Middlesex County, Jamaica - Parishes
... Middlesex County On map Parish Area km² Population Census 2001 Capital 6 Clarendon 1,196.3 237,024 May Pen 185,801 Mandeville 8 Saint Ann 1,212.6 166,762 Saint Ann's Bay 9 Saint Catherine 1,192.4 482,308 Spanish ...

Famous quotes containing the word county:

    I know this well, that if one thousand, if one hundred, if ten men whom I could name,—if ten honest men only,—ay, if one HONEST man, in this State of Massachusetts, ceasing to hold slaves, were actually to withdraw from this copartnership, and be locked up in the county jail therefor, it would be the abolition of slavery in America. For it matters not how small the beginning may seem to be: what is once well done is done forever.
    Henry David Thoreau (1817–1862)