List of Fictional Vice Presidents of The United States

List Of Fictional Vice Presidents Of The United States

Clayton M. Abernathy

  • Vice President in Eye in the Sky by Fun Publications.
  • This character is the evil mirror-universe counterpart of the heroic G.I. Joe character Hawk.

Barbara Adams

  • Whoops Apocalypse (1986 film)
  • Written by Andrew Marshall and David Renwick, directed by Tom Bussmann, played by Loretta Swit.
  • Succeeds to presidency upon death of President Hugo Burlap.

Mackenzie Allen

  • Commander in Chief (television series 2005)
  • Created by American director Rod Lurie, played by Geena Davis
  • Political independent chosen by President Theodore Roosevelt "Teddy" Bridges as his running mate.
  • The first female vice president and, upon Bridges' death, the first female president.
  • Home State: Connecticut

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Other articles related to "vice, president":

List Of Fictional Vice Presidents Of The United States - Real-life
... Bill Bradley Vice President in a second version of Shall We Tell the President? by Jeffrey Archer Under President Florentyna Kane Dale Bumpers Vice President in a first version of Shall We Tell the ... Serves as Vice President of Hosea Blackford from 1929–1933, on the Socialist Party ticket ... Ted Kennedy Voyage, by Stephen Baxter Is Jimmy Carter's Vice President in the 1976 election, winning over Walter Mondale at the convention due to lobbying ...

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