List of Fictional Literature Featuring Opera

List Of Fictional Literature Featuring Opera

This is a list of literary fiction which features opera in the plot. "Features" excludes fleeting mentions: for a literary work to be on this list opera must be a significant part of the plot, or, alternatively, provide significant context and backdrop. The bibliographic references are to the date and place of earliest publication.

Read more about List Of Fictional Literature Featuring OperaAuthors A-B, Authors C, Authors D, Authors E-F, Authors G-H, Authors I-K, Authors L, Authors M, Authors N-Q, Authors R, Authors S, Authors T-Z

Other articles related to "list of fictional literature featuring opera, opera":

List Of Fictional Literature Featuring Opera - Authors T-Z
... a novel of love Leo Tolstoy War and Peace Helen Traubel The Metropolitan Opera Murders Anthony Trollope The Landleaguers Carl Van Vechten Interpreters and interpretations Jules Verne Dr ... Werfel Verdi Roman der Oper Edith Wharton The Age of Innocence Kirby Williams The Opera Murders Audrey Williamson Funeral March for Siegfried Chelsea Quinn Yarbro Music when Sweet Voices Die (later ...

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