List of English Inventions and Discoveries

List Of English Inventions And Discoveries

English inventions and discoveries are objects, processes or techniques invented or discovered partially or entirely by a person born in England. In some cases, their Englishness is determined by the fact that they were born in England, of non-English people working in the country. Often, things discovered for the first time are also called "inventions", and in many cases, there is no clear line between the two.

The following is a list of inventions or discoveries generally believed to be English:

This is an incomplete list, which may never be able to satisfy particular standards for completeness. You can help by expanding it with reliably sourced entries.

Read more about List Of English Inventions And DiscoveriesAgriculture, Clock Making, Clothing Manufacturing, Communications, Computing, Criminology, Cryptography, Engineering, Food, Household Appliances, Industrial Processes, Medicine, Military, Mining, Musical Instruments, Photography, Publishing Firsts, Science, Sport, Miscellaneous

Other articles related to "list of english inventions and discoveries, english":

List Of English Inventions And Discoveries - Miscellaneous
... Airy Produced the first complete printed translation of the Bible into English – Myles Coverdale Venn diagram – John Venn vulcanisation of rubber – Thomas Hancock Silicone – Frederick ...

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