List of Edgar Allan Poe Award For Best Young Adult Novel Winners

The Edgar Allan Poe Awards (popularly called the Edgars), named after Edgar Allan Poe, are presented every year by the Mystery Writers of America. They remain the most prestigious awards in the entire mystery genre. The award for Best Young Adult Mystery was established in 1989 and recognizes works written for ages twelve to eighteen, and grades eight through twelve. Prior to the establishment of this award, the Mystery Writers of America awarded a special Edgar to Katherine Paterson for The Master Puppeteer in 1977.

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    My list of things I never pictured myself saying when I pictured myself as a parent has grown over the years.
    Polly Berrien Berends (20th century)

    There was an Old Man who said, ‘Hush!
    I perceive a young bird in this bush!’
    Edward Lear (1812–1888)

    Children who are pushed into adult experience do not become precociously mature. On the contrary, they cling to childhood longer, perhaps all their lives.
    Peter Neubauer (20th century)

    The award of a pure gold medal for poetry would flatter the recipient unduly: no poem ever attains such carat purity.
    Robert Graves (1895–1985)

    The two real political parties in America are the Winners and the Losers. The people don’t acknowledge this. They claim membership in two imaginary parties, the Republicans and the Democrats, instead.
    Kurt Vonnegut, Jr. (b. 1922)

    Do your children view themselves as successes or failures? Are they being encouraged to be inquisitive or passive? Are they afraid to challenge authority and to question assumptions? Do they feel comfortable adapting to change? Are they easily discouraged if they cannot arrive at a solution to a problem? The answers to those questions will give you a better appraisal of their education than any list of courses, grades, or test scores.
    Lawrence Kutner (20th century)

    This wild star—it is now three centuries since, with clasped hands, and with streaming eyes,... I spoke it ... into birth.
    —Edgar Allan Poe (1809–1849)

    Some sepulcher, remote, alone,
    Against whose portal she hath thrown,
    In childhood, many an idle stone—
    Some tomb from out whose sounding door
    She ne’er shall force an echo more,
    Thrilling to think, poor child of sin!
    It was the dead who groaned within.
    —Edgar Allan Poe (1809–1849)