List of Brown University Buildings - Residential Buildings - Residence Halls - Wriston Quadrangle

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Wriston Quadrangle

Wriston Quadrangle, built from 1950 to 1952, consists of 9 residential buildings bordered by George Street, Thayer Street, Charlesfield Street, and Brown Street. Fifty-one buildings in total were razed to make space for the development. The buildings were designed to house a fraternity on each end of the building, with independents living in the rooms in between.

At the time the quad was built, many of the University's fraternities were in financial trouble and membership numbers struggled due to the limited number of civilian students on campus (much of the University's housing at the time was used for students in the Armed Forces training program). In return for University housing in Wriston Quadrangle, the fraternities were asked to deed their privately owned houses (many in disrepair) to the University.

The quad still houses the majority of the University's fraternities, sororities, and program houses.

Building Image Architect Constructed Capacity Notes Reference
Buxton House Perry, Shaw and Hepburn 1950–1952 Buxton House is named for Colonel G. Edward Buxton, Jr. (class of 1902), who was Chairman of the Housing and Development Campaign for Wriston Quadrangle. The house is currently home to Buxton International House, one of Brown's program houses.
Chapin House Perry, Shaw and Hepburn 1950–1952 Chapin House is named for Dr. Charles V. Chapin (class of 1876), professor of Physiology. Chapin was Superintendent of Health in Providence for 48 years and pioneered modern methods of treating infectious diseases in the Providence City Hospital.Chapin House is home to both the Theta Delta Chi Fraternity and Harambee House, one of Brown's program houses.
Diman House Perry, Shaw and Hepburn 1950–1952 Diman House is named for Jeremiah Lewis Diman (class of 1851), professor of History at the University. The building is home to both the Kappa Alpha Theta Sorority and Interfaith House, one of Brown's program houses.
Goddard House Perry, Shaw and Hepburn 1950–1952 Goddard House is named for William Giles Goddard (class of 1812), professor of Moral Philosophy and Metaphysics and of "Belles-Lettres" and Trustee and Fellow of the University. Goddard House is home to the Alpha Delta Phi Society and Delta Phi Fraternity.
Harkness House Perry, Shaw and Hepburn 1950–1952 Harkness House is named for Professor Albert Harkness (class of 1842), professor of Classics and a Fellow of the University from 1904 to 1907. Harkness House is home to both Technology House and Art House, two of Brown's program houses.
Marcy House Perry, Shaw and Hepburn 1950–1952 Marcy House is named for William L. Marcy (class of 1808), Comptroller of the State of New York, U.S. Senator, Governor of New York for three terms, Secretary of War, and U.S. Secretary of State. Marcy House is houses both the Alpha Epsilon Pi Fraternity and the Zeta Delta Xi Fraternity.
Olney House Perry, Shaw and Hepburn 1950–1952 Olney is named for Richard Olney (class of 1856), Attorney General to President Cleveland and U.S. Secretary of State. Olney House is home to the Sigma Chi Fraternity, the Delta Tau Fraternity, and Cooking House, one of Brown's program houses.
Sears House Perry, Shaw and Hepburn 1950–1952 Sears House, named for Barnas Sears (class of 1825), president of the University from 1855 to 1867. The building is home to both the Alpha Chi Omega Sorority and Phi Kappa Psi Fraternity
Wayland House Perry, Shaw and Hepburn 1950–1952 Wayland House is named for Francis Wayland, president from 1827 to 1855. The first floor of Wayland House is occupied by the Office of Residential Life and the Office of Auxiliary Housing. The doubles on the upper floors are used to house freshman; the singles and fourth floor suites are occupied by upperclassmen. The building is also the home of the Jabberwocks of Brown University, the school's oldest male a cappella group, who maintain their practice room and headquarters in the basement of North Wayland.

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